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Round Slings vs. Web Slings

Round Slings vs. Web Slings

When it comes to lifting heavy objects, using the right equipment is crucial for safety and efficiency. Round slings and web slings are two common types of lifting slings that are used for this purpose. While both of them are designed to lift heavy loads, they differ in construction and usage.

In this blog post, we'll take a closer look at round slings and web slings as well as the differences between both types!

 

What are Round Slings?

Round slings are a type of lifting sling made from a continuous loop of synthetic fibers. They are designed to be flexible and strong, and are used to lift heavy loads. Round slings are commonly made from materials such as nylon, polyester, or polypropylene.

The construction of a round sling consists of a protective outer cover that encloses an inner load-bearing core. The cover protects the inner core from abrasion and damage while the sling is in use. The load-bearing core is made from one continuous length of fiber that is woven together in a tight pattern to create a strong, flexible loop.

Round slings are available in a variety of lengths and weight capacities to suit different lifting requirements. They are also color-coded to indicate their weight capacity, making it easy to select the right sling for the job.

 

How to use a Round Sling

Using a round sling is a simple process that involves a few key steps:

  1. Inspection: Before using a round sling, inspect it for signs of damage, including cuts, abrasions, or fraying. If any damage is found, the sling should not be used and should be taken out of service.

  2. Selection: Choose a round sling that is appropriate for the load being lifted. The sling's weight capacity should be greater than the weight of the load.

  3. Configuration: Determine the appropriate configuration for the sling based on the lifting application. Common configurations include vertical, basket, and choker hitches.

  4. Attachment: Attach the round sling to the load using appropriate hardware, such as hooks or shackles. Make sure that the attachment points are properly aligned with the load's center of gravity.

  5. Lifting: Lift the load using proper lifting techniques and equipment. Avoid jerking or twisting the load, and do not exceed the sling's weight capacity.

  6. Inspection: After use, inspect the round sling again for signs of damage. If any damage is found, the sling should be taken out of service and replaced.

It is important to follow manufacturer guidelines and regulations when using a round sling to ensure safe and proper use. Regular maintenance and proper storage can also help prolong the life of the sling and ensure its continued safety and effectiveness in lifting heavy loads.

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What is a Web Sling?

Web slings are a type of lifting sling commonly used in industrial and construction settings. They are made from a flat strip of webbing, typically constructed of nylon or polyester fibers. The webbing is folded and stitched to create a loop, with the stitching forming the load-bearing points. This design allows web slings to be highly customizable in terms of length, weight capacity, and configuration.

Web slings are available in a variety of styles, including endless, eye and eye, and endless grommet. Endless slings are a continuous loop with no end fittings, and are ideal for use in choker or basket hitches. Eye and eye slings have loops sewn on both ends, allowing them to be used in vertical, basket, or choker hitches. Endless grommet slings are similar to endless slings, but have a metal grommet at one end to provide a wear-resistant contact point.

One of the benefits of web slings is their versatility. They can be used in a variety of lifting applications, including horizontal, vertical, and choker hitches. They are also lightweight, making them easy to transport and maneuver. However, web slings are not as flexible as round slings and are not suitable for lifting loads with irregular shapes or contours.

 

How to use a Web Sling

Using a web sling is a simple process that involves a few key steps:

  1. Inspection: Before using a web sling, inspect it for signs of damage, including cuts, abrasions, or fraying. If any damage is found, the sling should not be used and should be taken out of service.

  2. Selection: Choose a web sling that is appropriate for the load being lifted. The sling's weight capacity should be greater than the weight of the load.

  3. Configuration: Determine the appropriate configuration for the sling based on the lifting application. Common configurations include vertical, basket, and choker hitches.

  4. Attachment: Attach the web sling to the load using appropriate hardware, such as hooks or shackles. Make sure that the attachment points are properly aligned with the load's center of gravity.

  5. Lifting: Lift the load using proper lifting techniques and equipment. Avoid jerking or twisting the load, and do not exceed the sling's weight capacity.

  6. Inspection: After use, inspect the web sling again for signs of damage. If any damage is found, the sling should be taken out of service and replaced.

It is important to follow manufacturer guidelines and regulations when using a web sling to ensure safe and proper use. Regular maintenance and proper storage can also help prolong the life of the sling and ensure its continued safety and effectiveness in lifting heavy loads. Additionally, web slings should not be used to lift loads with sharp edges or corners, as this can damage the sling and reduce its weight capacity.

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Round Slings vs. Web Slings: Differences

While both round slings and web slings are used for lifting heavy loads, there are some key differences between the two types of lifting slings.

  1. Construction: Round slings are made from a continuous loop of synthetic fibers, while web slings are made from a flat strip of webbing that is folded and stitched to create a loop.

  2. Flexibility: Round slings are more flexible than web slings, allowing them to conform to the shape of the load being lifted. Web slings are less flexible and are better suited for lifting loads with flat surfaces.

  3. Load capacity: Round slings generally have a higher weight capacity than web slings, making them suitable for lifting heavier loads.

  4. Handling: Round slings are easier to handle than web slings, as they are less likely to twist or tangle during use.

  5. Wear resistance: Round slings are more wear-resistant than web slings, as the protective outer layer surface is less likely to suffer from abrasion and cuts.

  6. Customization: Web slings are more customizable than round slings, as they can be made in various lengths, widths, and configurations to suit different lifting requirements.

 

Ultimately, the choice between round slings and web slings will depend on the specific lifting application and the load being lifted. While both types of slings are designed to be safe and effective, it is important to follow manufacturer guidelines and regulations to ensure proper use and maintenance of the sling.

 

 

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